Full-circle patient care

Education and patient care go hand-in-hand.  As a dialysis nurse, you have the unique opportunity to bring treatment full-circle by not only meeting the patient’s physical needs through treatment, but by creating a dialogue with them through Hemodialysis Patientthe process. 

Ignorance isn’t always bliss. A first time patient, or even a return patient with a new process being administered, may be fearful of the how and why of dialysis. 

Use this chance to educate and explain things as you go.  Your discussion will help ease worries and hopefully make the experience a little less of a mystery. 

Diabetes drives dialysis demands

With the diabetes epidemic at an all-time high, the demand for dialysis nurses is growing as well.   According to the American Diabetes Association:

  • 1.4 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes every year, and about 208,000 of those are under the age of 20. 
  • Diabetes was listed as the primary cause of kidney failure in 44% of all new cases in 2011. 
  • In 2011, 49,677 people of all ages began treatment for kidney failure due to diabetes.
  • A total of 228,924 people of all ages with kidney failure due to diabetes were living on chronic dialysis or with a kidney transplant.  Learn more at American Diabetes Association

There is no place like home

As a dialysis nurse, in some circumstances, you may have the ability to teach your patient to administer their own home treatments.  Increasing a patient’s independence is a gift to them, and knowing how to get them to that point is a great area of study in your profession. 

Many dialysis patients go on to lead independent lives well after diagnosis. This often leads to strong bonds between patients and nurses.

With diabetes on the rise and more patients in need of dialysis, your job is all the more important.  Knowing the range of education you can provide them while maintaining a high quality of care will lead to a long and rewarding career.